Sandscapes Scarf FREE PATTERN

Crochet On The Brain

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QUEUE OR FAVORITE ❤ THIS PATTERN ON RAVELRY!

Sandscapes Scarf Crochet Pattern

©2017 Amanda Bryant

Materials:

2 skeins Red Heart Unforgettable 100% Acrylic medium weight yarn (each skein 3.5 oz/100 g; 270 yards/246 meters)- color “Pearly”

6 mm crochet hook

yarn needle to weave in ends

Gauge: 4 sc= 1 inch, 4 rows in pattern= 1 inch

Finished Measurements: approx. 54 inches long x 7 1/2 inches wide

Abbreviations Used (American Terminology):

ch- chain

sc- single crochet

sk- skip

sp (sps)- space (spaces)

Instructions:

Ch 35

Row 1- in the back bump of the foundation ch, sc in the 2nd ch from the hook and in ea ch across, ch 1, turn (34 sc)

Row 2- sc in the 1st sc, ch 2, sk 2 sc, sc in the next sc, (ch 2, sk 2 sc, sc in the next sc) repeat the ( ) across the row, ch…

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Learn To Crochet- How To Make A Single Crochet (SC) & Weave In Ends- Photo Tutorial

Now that you’ve mastered making a basic Foundation Chain (FC), it’s time to learn how to make that first crochet stitch. In this photo tutorial I show you how to make a Single Crochet (SC) stitch into your FC, and how to weave in (and hide) yarn tails. As well, with learning this stitch, I’ll link you up with a free, simple washcloth pattern that uses the Single Crochet stitch.

But before we make a washcloth, let’s make a practice swatch (**PLEASE NOTE** If you are left-handed, you will simply be working in the opposite direction):

Gather your supplies:

You will need yarn, a crochet hook, a yarn needle (with an eye large enough that the yarn fits through), and a pair of scissors.

In this swatch, I used Peaches & Creme 100% cotton medium weight yarn, and a 5.5 mm crochet hook. This yarn is better suited for a 5 mm crochet hook, but I wanted to make sure the stitches were visible enough for this tutorial’s photos.  When you pick out your yarn to use, read the label, and it will tell you which hook size is recommended to use with that particular yarn.

ROW 1:

Step 1- The Foundation Chain (FC) Make a chain of 21 (in patterns, this would be written as “Ch 21”):

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Step 2- Insert your hook into the 2nd chain to the left of the hook, the first chain being the one that is on the hook. (There are different ways to insert your hook into the chain, but this is the easiest and quickest way for a beginner):

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Step 3- Wrap the working yarn over the hook:

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Step 4- Pull the yarn (that you just wrapped over the hook) through the chain stitch. You will now have 2 loops on the hook:

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Step 5- Wrap the working yarn over the hook again (like you did in Step 3), and pull the hooked yarn through both of the loops that are on the hook. You now have 1 Single Crochet (SC) stitch completed!:

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Step 6- To make your next SC stitch, insert your hook into the next empty chain to the left of the SC stitch that you just made:

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Next, repeat Steps 3 through 5 to make your next SC, and continue to repeat Steps 3 through 5 for each of your next SC’s across to the end of your foundation chain. At the end of the row, it should look like this (you will have 20 sc worked into your FC):

 

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ROW 2:

Now we make another row of SC’s.

Step 1- To do this, make 1 ch (in a pattern, written as “Ch 1”). Remember from the Foundation Chain (FC) Tutorial how to make a chain (wrap the yarn over the hook, then pull the yarn through the loop on the hook). The “Ch 1” acts as a “turning chain”. It helps to keep the side edges of the rows neat and straight. This is what your “Ch 1” will look like when completed:

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Step 2- After you’ve made your “Ch 1”, turn your work around so that the other side of the work is now facing you:

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Next,  insert your hook under the top 2 loops (shown with the little black arrows in the first photo directly below) of the first SC (which is where the Ch 1 is connected to, shown in the second photo below). Wrap the working yarn over the hook:

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Step 3- Pull the working yarn through the 2 loops of the SC, so that you now have 2 loops on your hook. Wrap the working yarn over the hook again:

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Step 4- Pull the working yarn through both of the loops that are on the hook. You now have 1 sc made on your second row:

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Step 5- Insert your hook into the top loops of the next SC. Wrap the working yarn over the hook:

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Step 6- Pull the wrapped yarn through the top loops of the SC. You will have 2 loops on the hook. Wrap the yarn over the hook again:

Step 7- Pull the wrapped yarn through the 2 loops that are on the hook. You now have 2 SC in your 2nd row.

Repeat Steps 4 through 7 of ROW 2 instructions. At the end of this second row it will look like this (20 SC made in this row also) :

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To make another row, simply repeat the entire set of instructions that are laid out for ROW 2.

After you’ve completed 6 rows, your work will look like this:

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After 12 completed rows, it will look like this (the same, but bigger and better!):

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When you reach the size of practice swatch that satisfies you, it’s time to snip the yarn and finish it off! To do this, when you reach the end of your last row, make a Ch 1. Cut the yarn (leave a 5 or 6 inch long yarn tail), and then pull the cut yarn through the Ch 1 with your hook. Pull it tightly so that the knot formed is secure.

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It will look like this (photo below), with the working yarn at the top of the work being cut and secured.

This photo below also shows the Right Side (RS) of the work, which is the side that you want to show off, that you want everyone to look at. If you make a garment, you want the RS of the work on the outside of the garment.  When making a piece where you start with the traditional foundation chain (which we did here), the beginning tail of yarn will be on the left hand side when looking at the RS of the work, and when looking at the Wrong Side (WS) of the work, the beginning tail of yarn will be on the right hand side (Opposite if you are working left-handed). The RS and WS of work varies according to different patterns and stitches, and sometimes can be a bit tricky to determine which is which (don’t worry, there are ways to tell!). But for this project, this is the RS of the work:

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When finishing up a project, you must also weave in all of your yarn tails (in this swatch, it is only the beginning tail from the FC and the ending tail that you just cut). This is done with a yarn needle (large or small, depending on the thickness of your yarn).

To begin, first string your yarn tail through the yarn needle, and turn work over so that you are looking at the WS of the work:

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Next, insert your yarn needle (on the WS of your work) through the top thickness of the stitches you made, a couple of inches across (don’t push your needle through to the other side of the work):

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Then pull the needle, with yarn, through those stitches:

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Now, turn the needle around and run it back through those stitches, making sure that the needle and yarn are inserted under a different ply of the stitches (so that you aren’t just undoing the weaving you just did):

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You can run the needle and yarn through the stitches in the same manner one or two more times to help ensure it’s secure. When you are done weaving it through, cut the yarn as close to the work as possible, without cutting your project, so that you can’t see any of the yarn tail popping out of the stitches:

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And you’re done! You’ve made your first SC swatch! Congratulations!

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Now that you’ve mastered the Single Crochet, do you think you can handle making your first Washcloth? You’ll be pleasantly surprised, I think, to find out that what you just made is pretty much the same thing as a basic Washcloth. Visit My First Crochet Washcloth- Free Pattern to get started!

 

 

My First Crochet Washcloth- Free Pattern

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Well, this isn’t MY first crochet washcloth, as I’ve made millions of them (ok, maybe just 20 or so, lol), but I wanted to publish an easy pattern to go along with my SC Tutorial.  Since washcloths are usually one of the first projects a new crocheter makes, I thought this would be an appropriate pattern. Everyone can use a washcloth, right?

QUEUE OR FAVORITE ❤ THIS PATTERN ON RAVELRY!

My First Crochet Washcloth

Free Pattern

© Amanda Bryant 2018

Materials Used:

Peaches & Creme 100% cotton medium weight (“4”) yarn; 2.5 oz/70.9 g; approx. 120 yards/109 meters- 1 ball- Color “Navy”

size H/ 5 mm crochet hook

scissors

Measuring tape or ruler (to check your gauge as well as the size of the finished piece)

yarn needle (for weaving in yarn tails)

Gauge: 4 sc= 1 inch, 4 rows= 1 inch (hold a ruler or measuring tape next to your work. There should be 4 sc measuring 1 inch, and 4 rows should measure 1 inch. Following the gauge will help to ensure that your washcloth will be the same size as the one in this pattern. If your gauge is larger than what is shown here- for example, you have 3 sc in 1 inch-,  use a smaller crochet hook [try a 4.5 mm hook]. If your gauge is smaller than what is shown here- for example you have 5 sc in 1 inch-, use a larger crochet hook [try a 5.5 mm hook]. Always try to get as close to the correct gauge as possible, especially in garments, so that your work will turn out the same size as shown in the pattern.)

Finished Measurements:  about 9 1/2″ x 9 1/2″ (square)

Abbreviations Used (US Terminology):

Ch- chain

sc- single crochet

FC- foundation chain

RS- Right side (of work)

WS- Wrong side (of work)

Instructions:

Ch 35,

Row 1 (RS)- make 1 sc in the 2nd chain from the hook, and make 1 sc in each of the next ch’s of the FC, ch 1, turn (34 sc)

Row 2 (WS)- make 1 sc in the first sc, and make 1 sc in each of the next sc across to the end of the row, ch 1, turn (34 sc)

Repeat Row 2 until 9 1/2 inches long (Or desired length), finishing with a WS row (your last row worked will be a WS wrong row).

Fasten off, weave in yarn tails.

And there you have it! Your first washcloth! Congratulations!

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Mom ‘n’ Me Crossbody Bag- Free Pattern

The bag is finished! I managed to finally sit down and sew in my lining yesterday afternoon while Olivia was napping.  I first posted about making this bag HERE. Looking at the date of the post, June 9th, I feel shocked that it really didn’t take me too long to make it, or actually, to make two of them!  (I didn’t even work on them every day…they both sat around untouched for at least a few days out of the approximate 10 days they were in the process of being designed and made). So, having said that, I can tell you that it’s a quick project. I was intimidated, at first, about putting a lining into the bag, but after having done it I now see just how easy it is. I feel completely confident in doing it again, and I know that you can do it too! At the end of the pattern I’ve provided a link to the tutorial that I followed for lining it. Easy Peasy 🙂

QUEUE OR FAVORITE ❤ THIS PATTERN ON RAVELRY!

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Mom ‘n’ Me Crossbody Bag

Free Pattern

© Amanda Bryant 2018

Materials Used:

Adult sized purse:

Red Heart Super Saver- 100% acrylic medium weight yarn, 7 oz/198 g, 364 yards/333 meters-

MC- Turqua

CCA- Bright Yellow

CCB- Grenadine

CCC- Spring Green

Child sized purse:

Red Heart Super Saver- 100% acrylic medium weight yarn, 7 oz/198 g, 364 yards/333 meters-

MC- Bright Yellow

CC- Amethyst

Additional Materials used for both purses:

– 5.5 mm hook

– Stitch markers- 5- 1 for marking beg/end of rounds, 4 for marking where straps are placed

– (optional) 1 Single Fat Quarter 100% cotton fabric (18”x21”) for lining (1 pack per purse being made)- these can be found at Walmart for 97 cents each (shown in this photo below)

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– yarn needle for weaving in ends

– sewing needle for sewing lining into purse (or a sewing machine if you have one, or that’s what you prefer to use…I don’t have one 😦 )

– coordinating sewing thread for sewing lining into purse

– sewing pins for pinning lining to bag

– scissors

– iron for the lining (optional, but very helpful)

Gauge: 4 sc and 4 rounds= 1 inch ** Please note that different colors of Red Heart Super Saver vary in their thickness. The gauge in my child sized purse is ever so slightly different from the adult sized purse. This will not affect the sizing very much, and it is ok if your gauge is a slight bit off. Just try to get as close as you can to my gauge.

Finished Measurements: Adult sized purse- 10 inches wide x 9 inches tall, with a ½ inch deep base. Strap- 44 inches long; Child sized purse- 8 inches wide x 6 1/2 inches tall, with a 1/2 inch deep base. Strap- 22 inches long

Abbreviations Used (American Terminology):

MC- main color

CC- contrasting color

CCA- contrasting color A

CCB- contrasting color B

CCC- contrasting color C

RS- right side (of work)

Ch- chain

Sc- single crochet

Sl st- slip stitch

Beg- beginning

Special Notes:

  • When making the color changes, I did not cut the MC when working 2 rounds of the CC’s. I only cut the CC’s, since the color changes for the CC’s are so far apart. Since there are only 2 rounds of CC between the 4 rounds of MC’s, I just kept the MC running up the join sts. Since there is a lining, I did not feel there was a need to make the inside of the bag too pretty. However, if you are not using a lining, you can change this method, by cutting the yarn and weaving in the ends,  to make the inside of the bag prettier and neater.
  • Also with making the color changes, you are free to use whatever method of changing the color that you wish to or are accustomed to. What I did was at the end of the round I made my join with the old color, and then changed to the new color in the ch-1 at the beginning of the next round. This helped keep the color-change a little less noticeable. 20180611_162745
  • The child sized purse directions are listed first, with directions for the adult sized purse in (parenthesis)
  • Different colors of Red Heart Super Saver vary in their thickness. The gauge in my child sized purse is ever so slightly different from the adult sized purse. This will not affect the sizing very much, and it is ok if your gauge is a slight bit off. Just try to get as close as you can to my gauge.
  • Feel free to play around with different striping patterns, or even no striping pattern at all. This purse would look really cute in a solid color with appliques or embellishments sewn on to the front of it.  Customize and make it to your liking!
  • The strap is made in 2 sections; one strap on either side of the bag, and then sewn together to meet in the middle.

Instructions:

With MC

Ch 31 (41),

Round 1- make 1 sc in the second ch from the hook, make 1 sc in each ch across row. Next, working in a round, make 1 sc in the first unused loop from the other side of the foundation ch, and make 1 sc in each of the rest of the unused loops in the foundation ch. Join with a sl st to the first sc 60 (80 sc) **the photo below shows how it will look when you work around to the other side of the foundation chain. The stitch marker (safety pin) is in the first sc of the round.

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And then this photo below shows what the beginning round will look like once complete and joined to the first sc:

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Round 2- ch 1, make 1 sc in each of the sc around, join with a sl st to the first sc 60 (80 sc)

Repeat Round 2, following the color pattern (you are free to do your own color pattern, but this is the color pattern I made):

Child sized purse:

Rounds 3-4- MC

Rounds 5-6- CC

Rounds 7-10- MC

Rounds 11-12- CC

Rounds 13-16- MC

Rounds 17-18- CC

Rounds 19- 22- MC

Rounds 23- 24- CC

Rounds 25- 28- MC

Adult sized purse:

Rounds 3-4-  MC

Rounds 5-6- CCA

Rounds 7-10-  MC

Rounds 11- 12- CCB

Rounds 13- 16- MC

Rounds 17- 18- CCC

Rounds 19- 22- MC

Rounds 23- 24- CCA

Rounds 25- 28- MC

Rounds 29- 30- CCB

Rounds 31- 34- MC

Rounds 35- 36- CCC

Rounds 37- 40- MC

At the end of Round 28 (40) fasten off.

Strap:

Flattening the bag, find the middle sc of the edge on both sides of the bag (see photo below).  Place markers 3 (4) sts over on either side of the flattened edge [so there will be 4 (6) scs between the 2 markers]. Do the same with the other side edge of the bag. These markers are where you will begin the straps.

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**Next, with RS of the bag facing, attach MC in the first sc to the left of the first marker. Make 1 sc in the same st, and 1 sc in each of the next 3 (5) sc up to the next marker. Ch 1, turn (leaving the remaining of the sts unworked). This will give you 4 (6) sc’s to work across.

Next- make 1 sc in each of the sc across the row, ch 1, turn – 4 sc (6 sc). The photo below shows what the beginning of the strap will look like.

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Repeat this last row until the strap is approximately 11 (22) inches long (or whatever your strap length preference is).**  This will make the first half of the strap. When you have you reached the right length, fasten off and then follow the instructions from ** to **  for the second half of the strap. At the end of the second strap, fasten off, leaving a long yarn tail. Use this yarn tail to sew the 2 strap halves together.

Trim- at the base of the strap, in the first unworked sc of round 28 (40), attach MC. Work a sl st in the first sc (place a marker in this sl st) and in each sc across the top of the purse opening, and around the edge of the strap (one sl st in the edge of each sc row of the strap) to the st marker. Join with a sl st to the first sl st and fasten off. Repeat this on the other side of the purse.

Tie in all loose ends. If you are making a lining, you do not have to worry about tying in the loose ends from the color changes of the body of the purse. The lining will hide this “mess”. However, be sure to tie in the loose ends of yarn around the top opening of the purse.

Lining-

Since this is my first time lining a bag (following instructions anyhow, lol), I looked up how to do it online. I found a very simple photo tutorial on Craftsy and followed it. You can use this tutorial too, by clicking HERE. I did do a couple of things extra/different:

In the first step of sewing the lining seams, after I folded the lining, and before sewing, I ironed the folded edge to help keep it in place while sewing, in addition to pinning it in place.

Also, since my bag doesn’t have any real depth (only a 1/2 inch), I skipped the optional step of sewing a boxed corner.

Here is a photo of what my bag with lining looks like:

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And a photo of Olivia wearing her purse. Olivia’s purse is not lined, yet. But the instructions for the child-sized purse lining are the same as the larger purse.

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UPDATE: JUNE 24, 2018

I found a really cute fabric for Olivia’s purse yesterday, My Little Pony, and last night I sewed it in for the lining:

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Toilet Paper Cover- Free Pattern

Who didn’t have one of these in their bathroom while growing up? My mother still has one that my Nan made over 40 years ago.

Saturday was a rainy and cool day, a good day to stay indoors and get things done. While working on my “spring cleaning” I decided I wanted to make something easy and fast. I thought about a few things (which I’ve saved in my mental to-do list for future rainy days, lol), but after doing a Google search for quick crochet projects I came across images for crocheted toilet paper covers. It brought me back to my childhood and memories of my grandmothers (amazing, the things that can bring back memories), and decided I’d try to whip up one of these on my own.  And, truth be told, I was a bit surprised that people are still making these things!

My version of the TP Cover is just basic. No bells and whistles. But you could easily add embellishments to it yourself, such as crocheted flowers or appliques that match your bathroom décor (or the décor of whoever you might gift it to). You could even add some animal ears and stitch on a face! It’s up to you! The one that my mom has, which my Nan made, has a drawstring around the base of it, with pom-poms attached to the drawstring. While doing my Google search, I also came across images of TP covers with fashion dolls (Barbie type) on the top, and the cover being the skirt of her dress. I remember my grandma making these ones too.

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QUEUE OR FAVORITE ❤ THIS PATTERN ON RAVELRY!

Toilet Paper Cover

Free Crochet Pattern

© Amanda Bryant 2018

Materials Used:

Red Heart Super Saver- 100% acrylic medium weight yarn, 7 oz/198 g, 364 yards/333 meters-  color Pale Yellow- less than ½ a skein

Size I/9 5.5 mm hook

Stitch marker to note end/beg of each round

Yarn needle for weaving in yarn tales

Measuring tape

A roll of toilet paper

Scissors

Gauge: 4 sc and 4 rounds= 1 inch

Measurements: to fit a roll of toilet paper 4 ½” diameter, 14 ½ “ circumference, 4” in height

Abbreviations Used (US Terminology):

Sl st- slip stitch

Ch- chain

Sc- single crochet

Hdc- half double crochet

Sk-  skip

St- stitch

Instructions:

Before beginning, you must measure your roll of toilet paper, since they come in different sizes.

First, measure the diameter

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Second, measure the height

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Third, measure the circumference

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Now, you will work the increase rounds (rounds 1-7 below) to match your diameter. If your TP roll is smaller than what i used, simply omit an increase round. By the end of Round 7 I had a diameter equal to the diameter of my TP, so that is when I stopped increasing. If your roll of TP is larger than the one I used for this pattern, simply increase by 8 more stitches, which adds an extra round.

Next, you should work a few rounds even (I started working even on Round 8), and then using a tape measure, measure the circumference of your work. It should be pretty close, if not spot-on, to the circumference of your TP.

And last of all, as soon as you’ve got the diameter and circumference down, continue to work even (rounds 8-27 of this written pattern). If your roll of TP is longer or shorter than mine, adjust the number of working-even rounds accordingly.  Once the length is done, you can add the final round (which in this pattern is Round 28).

Ok, so with all these notes out of the way, let’s begin!

Ch 2,

Round 1- make 8 sc in the 2nd ch from the hook, join with a sl st to the first sc (8 sc)

Round 2- ch 1, make 2 sc in each sc around, join with a sl st to the first sc (16 sc)

Round 3- ch 1, make 1 sc in the first sc, make 2 sc in the next sc, *(make 1 sc in the next sc, make 2 sc in the next sc), repeat from * around, join with a sl st to the first sc (24 sc)

Round 4- ch 1, make 1 sc in each of the first 2 sc, make 2 sc in the next sc, *(make 1 sc in each of the next 2 sc, make 2 sc in the next sc), repeat from * around, join with a sl st to the first sc (32 sc)

Round 5- ch 1, make 1 sc in each of the first 3 sc, make 2 sc in the next sc, *(make 1 sc in each of the next 3 sc, make 2 sc in the next sc), repeat from * around, join with a sl st to the first sc (40 sc)

Round 6- ch 1, make 1 sc in each of the first 4 sc, make 2 sc in the next sc, *(make 1 sc in each of the next 4 sc, make 2 sc in the next sc), repeat from * around, join with a sl st to the first sc (48 sc)

Round 7- ch 1, make 1 sc in each of the first 5 sc, make 2 sc in the next sc, *(make 1 sc in each of the next 5 sc, make 2 sc in the next sc), repeat from * around, join with a sl st to the first sc (56 sc)

Round 8-27-  ch 1, make 1 sc in each sc around, join with a sl st to the first sc (56 sc)

Round 28 (Final Round)- Ch 1, make (sc, hdc, sc) in first sc, sk next sc, *make (sc, hdc, sc) in next sc, sk next sc, repeat from * around, join with a sl st to the beginning sc

Fasten off. Weave in yarn tails. Add any emblishments that you wish to.

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Weekly Update- June 17, 2018

Happy Sunday and Happy Father’s Day!

It’s been a productive week for me. Well, two weeks really, since my last “weekly” update. I’ve managed to get a fair bit of crocheting in, as well as tying in some loose ends and some spring cleaning (had to get something done before Summer officially gets here!). I needed to clear out the old energy, and make room for new, better energy!

I wrote up a “to do” list about two weeks ago, and for a change I didn’t forget about it. A number of things were scratched off the list.

I frogged, finally, my knit sweater (which I wrote about and shared a photo of HERE). I’ve been considering, talking about, and planning to frog it for a long time now.  I began working on it back in the fall. I hadn’t touched it in quite a long time, and to be honest, I got bored with it and tired of it. So I took it apart and am currently figuring out what I’m going to make in place of it. I have 7 skeins of Caron Simply Soft (color Autumn Red). I’m thinking a poncho (crocheted). I did sit down on a few occasions since I frogged the sweater and played around with stitch patterns and gauge swatches to see what I could come up with. I’ve got a few great ideas brewing 🙂

That Ripple Blanket which I “finished” back in March, is really truly done now. I sat down a few nights ago and painstakingly tied in all of the yarn tails. As I was working on that, I turned to my husband and told him to never let me make another one again, lol. There were 22 colors, the color pattern repeated three times…too many tails! So now that it’s almost 100° F out there, the blanket is folded up, waiting for the cold weather to come back, in a large trash bag!

I published a couple of new patterns since my last update, and I’m happy that they’ve both been received well by readers. If you missed them, you can see them by clicking here: Bath Pouf- Free Pattern (With Photo Tutorial)  and The Orange Cat- Free Pattern.  I also re-blogged a couple of my older patterns, which you can check out here: Neck Pillow- Free Pattern and Best Friends Amigurumi- Free Pattern.

Chances are that if you’re reading/following this blog, you already know how to crochet. But if you don’t crochet, or you know of someone who wants to learn, I have begun a new series on learning! This is in response to the poll I recently held on the COTB Facebook fan page. The majority of voters chose that I publish How To’s/Tutorials for additional content on the blog. So, last week I published the introductory lesson, a post called Learn to Crochet- How To Make A Foundation Chain (FC)- Photo Tutorial. I plan to make regular posts on learning to crochet; the next one will be How To Single Crochet, which will also include a photo tutorial and probably a free pattern along with it. I will be doing tutorials for all of the basic stitches, and then I will move on to stitch patterns. I would love to do a video tutorial, but it’s not an option for me right now. We still live in a hotel, so we are all crammed into one room, and it’s never quiet. Well, the only time it’s quiet is when Olivia’s sleeping, but then Mommy and Daddy have to be quiet (relatively, lol). The TV is almost always on, even just as background noise. Anyway…point being…I have to stick with just photo tutorials for now.  And do you know just how difficult it can be to make a photo tutorial? I only have two hands, and we only have one window for natural lighting, and Olivia loves to “help”. A simple photo session can take me hours, just trying to get the best possible picture! Having said that, I do hope that I’m able to help people learn, and that the photo’s I provide are useful and beneficial.

One of my newest WIP’s- Crossbody/Sling Purse– is just about complete. I’ve cut and sewn the lining for the bag, and it’s now pinned into the bag waiting to be sewn in. I just need about an hour of uninterupted time to do that, since all of my sewing is done by hand. Then it will be done. I even made a child sized version of it for Olivia, hers being in a bright yellow and purple striped pattern (her choice…she loves bright colors!). It won’t be lined though, at least not for a while, as the owl print fabric that I bought for my purse doesn’t coordinate well with the color scheme of hers. On my next supply shopping trip I’ll pick up a fabric that will work well with hers. Once my purse is completed, I will publish the pattern here on the blog. I have to admit that I was surprised at how many views my post about this WIP received. I think that maybe readers were hoping for a pattern to go along with it? Well, if that’s the case, readers won’t have to wait much longer for the pattern 🙂

I have also been working on revising Olivia’s Chocolate Milk Hoodigan , using Red Heart Super Saver (acrylic) instead of cotton, since the acrylic is cheaper and I have plenty of it! It’ll be a long while before it’s done though. I am hoping to have it done by the fall, but we’ll see. I’ve gotten a lot of my other “stuff” taken care of this week, and like I said at the beginning of this post, there is now room for new, better energy (to work on other things!).  It does get to me to have so much unfinished business hanging around, cluttering up my space.

As for the Grenadine Doll, which I gave to Olivia, I’m not sure yet if I’ll be recreating it. I know in the beginning I thought I would be making a few of them, in different clothing and colors, as well as making a boy version. Maybe once I’m done with everything else that I’m doing, I’ll consider it again.

Yesterday was rainy and cool, a nice day to stay indoors and do a quickie project. So I created a new pattern, which should be published tomorrow sometime.

And I think that pretty much sums up this Weekly Update.

Until next post…

~Amanda~

The Orange Cat- Free Pattern

I’ve finally finished the revision of Olivia’s Kitty Cat pattern. In this version I used a slightly smaller crochet hook, I made the cat a bit rounder and sturdier, and the ears are smaller and all black instead of two-toned. The tail is also round, rather than the original triangular shape. Oh, and I changed the shape of the nose to triangle, from a straight-across stitch. (I know, my embroidery terminology is very professional, right? lol)

When I began making this revision, I asked Olivia which color, out of my stash of Red Heart Super Saver, she wanted me to use. Of course, she picked the brightest of all colors. Not just orange, but Flame orange, which, even in natural outdoor lighting, it’s very difficult to get a good, clear photo.

 

QUEUE OR FAVORITE ❤ THIS PATTERN ON RAVELRY!

The Orange Cat

Pattern

© 2018 Amanda Bryant

 

Materials Used:

Red Heart Super Saver medium weight (“4”) 100% acrylic yarn: 7 oz/198 g; 364 yards/333 m; Color “Flame”

Red Heart Super Saver medium weight (“4”) 100 % acrylic yarn: 7 oz/198 g; 364 yards/333 m; Color “Black”

Embroidery Floss (small amount for nose, mouth and whiskers)- black

Size F/5- 3.75 mm crochet hook

Stitch Marker

Yarn needle

Embroidery needle

Polyester Fiberfill

Size 15 mm safety eyes

Abbreviations Used (U.S. Terminology):

Ch- chain

Sc- single crochet

Sc2tog- single crochet two single crochet’s together (decrease)

Sl st- slip stitch

Gauge:  not important, just be sure your stitches are close together so the stuffing doesn’t pop through the stitches. If your stitches aren’t tight enough go down in hook size.

Finished Measurements: about 9 inches high (sitting, excluding ears; with ears, about 10 inches high)

Special Notes:

  • The project is worked in the rounds (one continuous spiral) without joining, unless the instructions specify differently
  • Use a stitch marker to mark the end/beg of each round, and move the marker up as you complete each round
  • Stuff as work progresses, and stuff all parts firmly to ensure the cat will sit up and not flop over
  • The head and body are made as one piece, so there is no need to sew the two together
  • The arms (front/top legs) and the tail are almost identical, so if you assemble the cat after all parts are made instead of as you complete each part, make sure you mark which piece is what (so you don’t sew a tail where the arm is suppose to be).
  • At the end of this post there are a couple of photos, one of what all the individual pieces look like when completed, and one of the pieces all pinned onto the cat’s body.

Pattern Instructions:

Head, beginning at top

With Flame, make a magic ring, or ch 2

Round 1- make 6 sc in the magic ring–or make 6 sc in the 2nd ch from the hook if starting with a ch-2— (Pull closed tightly) (6 sc)

Round 2- make 2 sc in each sc around (12 sc)

Round 3- make 1 sc in the first sc, make 2 sc in the next sc, *(make 1 sc in the next sc, make 2 sc in the next sc), repeat from * around to the end (18 sc)

Round 4- make 1 sc in each of the first 2 sc, make 2 sc in the next sc, *(make 1 sc in each of the next 2 sc, make 2 sc in the next sc), repeat from * around to the end (24 sc)

Round 5- make 1 sc in each of the first 3 sc, make 2 sc in the next sc, *(make 1 sc in each of the next 3 sc, make 2 sc in the next sc), repeat from * around to the end (30 sc)

Round 6- make 1 sc in each of the first 4 sc, make 2 sc in the next sc, *(make 1 sc in each of the next 4 sc, make 2 sc in the next sc), repeat from * around to the end (36 sc)

Round 7- make 1 sc in each of the first 5 sc, make 2 sc in the next sc, *(make 1 sc in each of the next 5 sc, make 2 sc in the next sc), repeat from * around to the end (42 sc)

Round 8- make 1 sc in each of the first 6 sc, make 2 sc in the next sc, *(make 1 sc in each of the next 6 sc, make 2 sc in the next sc), repeat from * around to the end (48 sc)

Round 9- make 1 sc in each of the first 7 sc, make 2 sc in the next sc, *(make 1 sc in each of the next 7 sc, make 2 sc in the next sc), repeat from * around to the end (54 sc)

Rounds 10- 21- make 1 sc in each sc around to the end (54 sc)

Round 22- make 1 sc in each of the first 7 sc, sc2tog, *(make 1 sc in each of the next 7 sc, sc2tog), repeat from * around to the end (48 sc)

Round 23- make 1 sc in each of the first 6 sc, sc2tog, *(make 1 sc in each of the next 6 sc, sc2tog), repeat from * around to the end (42 sc)

Round 24- make 1 sc in each of the first 5 sc, sc2tog, *(make 1 sc in each of the next 5 sc, sc2tog), repeat from * around to the end (36 sc)

Round 25- make 1 sc in each of the first 4 sc, sc2tog, *(make 1 sc in each of the next 4 sc, sc2tog), repeat from * around to the end (30 sc)

Round 26- make 1 sc in each of the first 3 sc, sc2tog, *(make 1 sc in each of the next 3 sc, sc2tog), repeat from * around to the end (24 sc)

Place the safety eyes between rounds 13 and 14, about 5 or 6 stitches apart. Stuff head.

Round 27- make 1 sc in each of the first 2 sc, sc2tog, *(make 1 sc in each of the next 2 sc, sc2tog), repeat from * around to the end (18 sc)

Beginning the body

Round 28- make 1 sc in each of the first 2 sc, make 2 sc in the next sc, *(make 1 sc in each of the next 2 sc, make 2 sc in the next sc), repeat from * around to the end (24 sc)

Round 29- make 1 sc in each sc around to the end (24 sc)

Round 30- make 1 sc in each of the first 3 sc, make 2 sc in the next sc, *(make 1 sc in each of the next 3 sc, make 2 sc in the next sc), repeat from * around to the end (30 sc)

Round 31- make 1 sc in each sc around to the end (30 sc)

Round 32- make 1 sc in each of the first 4 sc, make 2 sc in the next sc, *(make 1 sc in each of the next 4 sc, make 2 sc in the next sc), repeat from * around to the end (36 sc)

Round 33- make 1 sc in each sc around to the end (36 sc)

Round 34- make 1 sc in each of the first 5 sc, make 2 sc in the next sc, *(make 1 sc in each of the next 5 sc, make 2 sc in the next sc), repeat from * around to the end (42 sc)

Round 35- make 1 sc in each sc around to the end (42 sc)

Round 36- make 1 sc in each of the first 6 sc, make 2 sc in the next sc, *(make 1 sc in each of the next 6 sc, make 2 sc in the next sc), repeat from * around to the end (48 sc)

Round 37- 46- make 1 sc in each sc around to the end (48 sc)

Round 47- make 1 sc in each of the first 6 sc, sc2tog, *(make 1 sc in each of the next 6 sc, sc2tog), repeat from * around to the end (42 sc)

Round 48- make 1 sc in each of the first 5 sc, sc2tog, *(make 1 sc in each of the next 5 sc, sc2tog), repeat from * around to the end (36 sc)

Round 49- make 1 sc in each of the first 4 sc, sc2tog, *(make 1 sc in each of the next 4 sc, sc2tog), repeat from * around to the end (30 sc)

Round 50- make 1 sc in each of the first 3 sc, sc2tog, *(make 1 sc in each of the next 3 sc, sc2tog), repeat from * around to the end (24 sc)

Stuff the body now, and then before the bottom of the cat is completely closed up, add some additional stuffing to ensure she has a solid body (so she can sit without falling over).

Round 51- make 1 sc in each of the first 2 sc, sc2tog, *(make 1 sc in each of the next 2 sc, sc2tog), repeat from * around to the end (18 sc)

Round 52- make 1 sc in the first sc, sc2tog, *(make 1 sc in the next sc, sc2tog), repeat from * around to the end (12 sc)

Round 53- sc2tog around to the end (6 sc)

Next, sl st in the next sc, then fasten off and cut yarn, leaving a long yarn tail. Using the yarn needle, weave yarn tail through the last 6 sts and pull tightly to close up hole. Secure yarn and weave yarn tail into the body.

Tail, beginning at tip

With Black, make a magic ring, or ch 2

Round 1- make 6 sc in the magic ring–or make 6 sc in the 2nd ch from the hook if starting with a ch-2— (6 sc)

Round 2- make 2 sc in each sc around to the end (12 sc)

Round 3- make 1 sc in the first sc, make 2 sc in the next sc, *(make 1 sc in the next sc, make 2 sc in the next sc), repeat from * around to the end (18 sc)

Rounds 4- 5-  make 1 sc in each sc around (18 sc)

Change to Flame

Rounds 6- 7 – make 1 sc in each sc around (18 sc)

Round 8- make 1 sc in each of the first 4 sc, sc2tog, *(make 1 sc in each of the next 4 sc, sc2tog), repeat from * around to the end (15 sc)

Round 9- 14 make 1 sc in ea

**stuff the tail firmly as work progresses

Round 15- make 1 sc in each of the first 3 sc, sc2tog, *(make 1 sc in each of the next 3 sc, sc2tog), repeat from * around to the end (12 sc)

Rounds 16-21- 1 sc in ea (12 sc)

Round 22- make 1 sc in each of the first 4 sc, sc2tog, make 1 sc in each of the next 4 sc, sc2tog (10 sc)

Round 23- make 1 sc in each sc around (10 sc)

Next, finish stuffing the tail–the fuller you stuff it, the better it’ll stand up on it’s own. Likewise, the looser you stuff it, the more it’ll lie flat or flop around. Flatten the open end of the tail closed and sc across, through both thicknesses, to close the tail (or you can fasten off, and then sew the open end closed with a yarn needle). Fasten off and cut yarn, leaving a long yarn tail for sewing the tail to the body. Sew tail to the middle back of the body, at about round 46-47 (where the decreases begin for the bottom of the body). If you’d like, you can pin (sew) the tail length to the cat’s back so that it won’t flop around, or you can leave it as is and let the tail flop around.

Arms (Front/Top Leg), beginning at foot (make 2)

With Black, make a magic ring, or ch 2

Round 1- make 6 sc in the magic ring–or make 6 sc in the 2nd ch from the hook if starting with a ch-2— (6 sc)

Round 2- make 2 sc in each sc around to the end (12 sc)

Round 3- make 1 sc in the first sc, make 2 sc in the next sc, *(make 1 sc in the next sc, make 2 sc in the next sc), repeat from * around to the end (18 sc)

Round 4-  make 1 sc in each sc around (18 sc)

Change to Flame

Rounds 5- 7 – make 1 sc in each sc around (18 sc)

Round 8- make 1 sc in each of the first 4 sc, sc2tog, *(make 1 sc in each of the next 4 sc, sc2tog), repeat from * around to the end (15 sc)

Round 9- 14 make 1 sc in ea

**stuff the arm firmly as work progresses

Round 15- make 1 sc in each of the first 3 sc, sc2tog, *(make 1 sc in each of the next 3 sc, sc2tog), repeat from * around to the end (12 sc)

Rounds 16-21- 1 sc in ea (12 sc)

Round 22- make 1 sc in each of the first 4 sc, sc2tog, make 1 sc in each of the next 4 sc, sc2tog (10 sc)

Round 23- make 1 sc in each sc around (10 sc)

Next, flatten the open end of the arm closed and sc across, through both thicknesses, to close the arm (or you can fasten off, and then sew the open end closed with a yarn needle). Fasten off and cut yarn, leaving a long yarn tail for sewing the arm to the body. Sew the arms to either side of the body, vertically and a slight bit on an angle, the top being placed 4 to 5 rounds below the neck

Legs (Back/Bottom), beginning with the foot (make 2)

With Black, make a magic ring, or ch 2

Round 1- make 6 sc in the magic ring– or make 6 sc in the 2nd ch from hook if starting with a ch-2—  (6 sc)

Round 2- make 2 sc in each sc around to the end (12 sc)

Round 3- make 1 sc in the first sc, make 2 sc in the next sc, *(make 1 sc in the next sc, make 2 sc in the next sc), repeat from * around to the end (18 sc)

Round 4- make 1 sc in each of the first 2 sc, make 2 sc in the next sc, *(make 1 sc in each of the next 2 sc, make 2 sc in the next sc), repeat from * around to the end (24 sc)

Rounds 5- make 1 sc in each sc around to the end (24 sc)

Change to Flame

Rounds 6- 8- make 1 sc in each sc around to the end (24 sc)

Round 9- make 1 sc in each of the first 6 sc, sc2tog, *(make 1 sc in each of the next 6 sc, sc2tog), repeat from * around to the end (21 sc)

Rounds 10- 11-  make 1 sc in each sc around to the end (21 sc)

Round 12- make 1 sc in each of the first 5 sc, sc2tog, *(make 1 sc in each of the next 5 sc, sc2tog), repeat from * around to the end (18 sc)

Rounds 13- 14 – make 1 sc in each sc around to the end (18 sc)

Round 15- make 1 sc in each of the first 4 sc, sc2tog, *(make 1 sc in each of the next 4 sc, sc2tog), repeat from * around to the end (15 sc)

**stuff leg firmly and continue to stuff as work progresses

Rounds 16-17-  make 1 sc in each sc around to the end (15 sc)

Round 18- make 1 sc in each of the first 3 sc, sc2tog, *(make 1 sc in each of the next 3 sc, sc2tog), repeat from * around to the end (12 sc)

Round 19- make 1 sc in each sc around (12 sc)

Next, finish stuffing the leg– the fuller you stuff it, the better it’ll support the body in a sitting position– Then, flatten the open end of the leg closed and sc across, through both thicknesses, to close the leg (or you can fasten off, and then sew the open end closed with a yarn needle). Fasten off and cut the yarn, leaving a long tail for sewing the leg to the body of the cat. Sew the legs to the side bottom portion of the body, vertically and lined up with the arms. To make placement easier, sit cat up and place legs in position. Pin the leg to where you want it to be before sewing it in place. The legs should line up evenly with the bottom of the body, so that they can help help support the body in the sitting position.

Ears, beginning at tip (make 2)

With Black, make a magic ring or ch 2

Round 1- make 6 sc in the magic ring– or make 6 sc in 2nd ch from hook if starting with ch-2–  (6 sc)

Round 2- make 1 sc in each sc around to the end (6 sc)

Round 3- make 2 sc in each sc around to the end (12 sc)

Round 4- make 1 sc in each sc around to the end (12 sc)

Round 5- make 1 sc in the first sc, make 2 sc in the next sc, *(make 1 sc in the next sc, make 2 sc in the next sc), repeat from * around to the end (18 sc)

Rounds 6-7 – make 1 sc in each sc around to the end (18 sc)

**do not stuff the ears

Next, flatten the open end together and sc through both thicknesses to close, or cut yarn and sew closed, leaving a long yarn tail to sew ear to head (do not stuff the ear).  Fasten off, leaving a long tail for sewing the ear to the head. Sew the ears to either side of the head, using the photo as guidance. The ear should rest somewhere between rounds 4 and 11, and should have a slight bend in the middle of it.

If you haven’t sewn all the pieces onto the body already, this is what you’ll have completed. To get an idea of how you would like it to look, you can pin the pieces onto the body before sewing.

 

Face:

Using the black embroidery floss and an embroidery or sewing needle, stitch on the nose, mouth and whiskers.

And you’re done! I hope you’ve enjoyed this pattern. Leave me a note, if you wish, and let me know what you think 🙂

~Amanda~